ABERDEEN BUILT SHIPS


Name
STAR OF AFRICA
Construction
IRON
Type
BARQUE
Date
1876
Official Number
51643
Description
Date of Build/Launch: October 1876

Owner: Anderson and Murison, Capetown

Lloyd's Register of Shipping:
1877-78: Owners Anderson and Murison. Port belonging to Capetown. Master W. Barron.
1880-81: As 1877-78. Port of survey Calcutta.
1881-82: No reference.

Wrecked near Capetown, 29 August 1880

Dundee Courier, 14/11/1876:
Barque STAR OF AFRICA, launched some weeks ago from Messrs Duthie's building yard, sailed on Saturday for Capetown with full cargo of coals.

York herald, 01/09/1880:
Capetown, 30 Aug. - British barque STAR OF AFRICA, from Calcutta for this port, struck on the Albatross Rock yesterday and became a total wreck. All on board except the second officer and one seaman were lost.

South Australian Register, 20/09/1880:
STAR OF AFRICA, owned by Messrs Anderson & Murison, has been totally wrecked on Albatross Rock, Captain Barron, his wife, the first mate and most of crew were drowned. The spot where she struck is about a mile from shore on a most desolate coast. Surf breaks very heavily and it would seem impossile for any boat to land in safety. Course had just been shaped, vessel was running at about 10 knots and anchors were being got ready to enter Table Bay when at about 4.30a.m. she struck. Sails were at once set to head for the shore, when she struck again aft and at once went down. There was no time to launch any boats. The second mate felt himself being drawn down into the vortex, when he clung to a hencoop and after some time managed to get to an upset boat, to which 4 or 5 others were holding on. They succeeded in righting her and with an oar which he found he managed with great difficulty (she being waterlogged) to scull her onshore. His fellow sufferers had died from exhaustion. Only other survivor was a Manilla man.
Shipbuilder
DUTHIE
Dimensions
length 154.5' x breadth 27.3' x depth 15.9'
gross tonnage 445 tons
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